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Kindness sounds so easy doesn’t it? If you ask me whether I’d describe myself as kind, I’d say, heck yeah, of course. I think most of us would. But when I stop and reflect on it, maybe I’m not so kind after all.

 

I’d definitely describe myself as not, UN-kind, which is certainly easier than being kind, but that doesn’t make me kind. For me, being kind takes effort. It’s something I need to be intentional about. Whether it be on I4 when someone wants to merge into my lane and nobody’s letting them in – I can let them in. Or at work when someone seems overwhelmed and could use a little help or encouragement – I can offer to help. Or at lunch when someone’s eating alone – I can sit with them. Or at home when you know your wife’s had a long day and it’s her night to cook – clean the house up and have dinner ready when she gets home. These are all little, easy acts of kindness that may go unacknowledged, or unnoticed, and maybe you won’t even see their impact, or perhaps they’ll change someone’s day. Maybe they’ll give hope to hopeless. Love to the unloved. Maybe someone will see Jesus.

 

Have you ever been on the receiving end of a random act of kindness? Like when the person in front of you in the Starbucks line pays for your coffee, or some unknown guest at a restaurant picks up your bill, or even when your boss lets you leave a little early? Feels good, huh? You instantly feel special. You feel loved. And usually, at least for me, it encourages me want to do something similar. It’s contagious.

 

This week I’d challenge you to be intentional about loving others through kindness. Do it daily. Do it at home. Do it at work. Do it where it’s toughest. And don’t do it for the attention, or to feel good about yourself. Do it because Christ calls us to love through kindness, and people need love. Your kindness might be the only love someone sees all day or all week.

 

“And we urge you, brothers, warn those who are idle, encourage the timid, help the weak,

be patient with everyone. Make sure that nobody pays back wrong for wrong,

but always try to be kind to each other and everyone else.”

– I Thessalonians 5:14 & 15